21 April 2008

Factory Tours

When I was a kid, I distinctly remember our school class touring Procter and Gamble to see soap being made and packaged. I also remember going to the factory where my dad worked and seeing huge stamping machines and the men, die-makers with their work aprons covered in fine metal shavings. It is good for kids to see how things are made. Unfortunately P&G doesn't do tours anymore, but there are lots of other factories that offer tours. Check out this site to find a list of factory tours across the country. Nearby are things like the Toyota factory in Georgetown, KY and the Airstream factory in Jackson Center, OH. The car factory could make a good scout or school field trip.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

My family lived in Chicago until I was 8. I loved the Kellogg's cereal factory tour with the ice cream sundae at the end and the Heinz pickle factory tour where you got a pickle and a paper hat!

Anonymous said...

When I was a kid, I remember my mom taking us to the great deli so we could watch bagels being made. Now Bruegger's has the window and somehow, the magic is gone. There's something about a factory or behind-the-scenes tour that makes the product more exciting.

CityKin said...

It is interesting how we remember these trips. I agree that it has something to do with the behind-the-scenes aspect, like we are being let-in on a secret.

dave said...

I remember the field trip to the farm sitting in makeshift bleachers in the barn as the farmer milked his cow. I'd be surprised if many kids get a chance to do that today.

fiona said...

Oh but Dave, your kids need to go to Sunrock Farm! They'll get to milk the cows or goats, gather eggs, hold a chick, bottle feed lambs. And learn from Farmer Frank about how we owe it all to women who started farming. They have school tours and family tours. It's out by NKU. It's a total blast; definitely worth the trip.
www.sunrock.farm

dave said...

Fiona, thank you for the tip. I definately need to hear the explanation how it was women who started farming. There is either a colossal gap in my K-12 education or Farmer Frank has had one too many pulls from his Kentucky shine supply.

Fiona said...

Well, since you asked, Farmer Frank explains it this way.
Prehistoric men were hunters. Prehistoric women were gatherers. It didn't take long for the women to realize that they could gather better stuff to eat if they planted it themselves instead of walking around looking for it.
So, as Farmer Frank says, "Let's give a cheer for women!"

CityKin said...

I see that Sunrock Farm sign all the time in Kentucky. I need to get over there with the kids and blog about it!

Fiona said...

Totally blew the URL:
www.sunrockfarm.org

Take your camera! The face on a kid who has reached under a chicken to grab a warm egg is priceless.