27 December 2008

E Squared Portland Broadcast

 
I had never heard about this TV series that is apparently being broadcast on PBS. The first one aired over a year ago. I just watched a few of them, and they are excellent. However the most recent, and the most relevant to Cincy, is the episode about transit in Portland OR. All the episodes are available as webcasts: Go to this site: http://www.e2-series.com/ and click on Webcast, and watch the Portland episode now, especially if you are a streetcar skeptic.

Some quotes from the episode:
In this city the pedestrian comes first.

...millions of avoided auto miles.

(the streetcar can be installed) a block a week...

We'll see many times that people will be taking the trolley, and they'll get off at this stop because they see my store.

We are a one car family with kids and we couldn't do that in most other cities.

I hear all the time that people are different in Portland. Look, the only thing different about Portland is that we've put enough of this stuff in place that people have a choice...
Watch the video now while it is free, because the older episodes must be purchased.

5 comments:

Randy Simes said...

Great stuff...thanks for sharing.

CityKin said...

Randy, I really like the three points of you most recent post, Letting Cincinnatians Down. Keep up the good fight.

Randy Simes said...

Thanks, that means a lot.

Dave said...

I don't understand the "why" behind those organizations not supporting the streetcar.

Are they concerned about motor vehicles being stuck behind a slow moving streetcar, no voice in determining potential stops, competition eliminating further bus routes?

Dave said...

Phoenix opens $1.4 billion light-rail system.

http://www.reuters.com/article/
newsOne/idUSTRE4BQ1W420081227

20-mile (32-km) system snakes through a sprawling desert metropolitan area that includes the cities of Tempe and Mesa.

Phoenix's old trolley system shut down 60 years ago.

Rides will be free until Thursday, the first day of 2009, when they will cost $1.25. A day pass will cost $2.50. Metro officials expect 26,000 boardings a day in 2009.